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NET FORCES IN QCD Back to the Contents
 

Do gluons really orbit each other?



   O  EVISE


Gluons are said to move about at the speed of light. As observed from us, outside observers, according to SR there is no elapse of time on the gluon. When 2 gluons merge, they couple in no time for this to do it in, nor in the frame of reference of one gluon, nor in the frame of reference of the other one.
Another picture. Two gluons meet each other, couple and then re-emits each other in preference directions: in opposite or the same direction (4 possibilities: , , , ). In the last 2 cases they simulate a composite, but in fact they are 2 independent gluons accidentally coinciding and coincidentally moving in the same direction. Of course this can only “explain” the zero orbital impulse momentum state.
If two gluons really orbit each other and still really move about with the speed of light, they might encounter black-hole-like properties.

Gravity curves spacetime up until the event horizon of a black hole. Still larger curvatures lay behind the horizon, impossible for us to see. A ray of light is kept in circular orbit around a black hole at a distance of 3/2 times the radius of the event horizon, although it is an unstable orbit. So when two gluons orbit each other at one and a half times their event horizons, this is physically difficult but not impossible. One has to prove the gluon has an event horizon.
But this isn’t General Relativity’s gravity with its tensors, but Colorforce of QCD consisting of innumerable wavefunction contributions. It isn’t spin-2 gravitons, but spin-1 vector-bosons. There is no experimental evidence at all about the velocity of the gluons.

Remarks like “They just merge and split” remind more to superstrings than to particles. Can quarks be particles while gluons are strings?
In this site so far I distinguished between a composite state of 2 gluons (dubbed glu2on) and the 1 gluon resulting when those 2 gluons merge. When the gluNon-concept must be abandoned, this difference disappears, leaving sole gluons only. This will cost us a lot of possibilities.
Then a gluon emitting 1 other gluon is expected to be far less abundant than a gluon emitting 2 gluons simultaneously. A gluon often split in 3 gluons, seldom in 2.
A gluon then seldom absorbs another gluon; most often a gluon absorbs 2 other gluons at the same time. 3 gluons can merge to 1 gluon, 2 gluons rarely merge. It affects a building block of QCD, the coupling between 2 gluons. What is the chance for 3 gluons coupling?
For the moment, since we know little about the structure of the gluon, the gluNon-concept is not abandoned. But it must be looked at carefully.


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THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: THE COLLAPSE OF THE WAVEFUNCTION  1  2  3  4  5
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: EXPERIMENTS ON THE COLLAPSE OF THE WAVEFUNCTION  1  2  3  4
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: FORWARD BACKWARD TIME DIRECTION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: THE DIRECTION OF TIME  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14
NET FORCE IN REAL MATTER  1  2  3  4
NET FORCE IN QED  1  2  3  4  5
NET FORCE  1  2  3  4  5
QUANTUM QUATERNION DYNAMICS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10
NET FORCES IN QCD  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16
THOUGHT EXPERIMENTS ON MASSES  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
NEWTON EINSTEIN KIEKENS GRAVITATION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
QUATERNION GRAVITATION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSE  1  2  3  4  5
SPECIAL RELATIVITY  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12
DIMENSIONS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
TIMETRAVEL  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8
EXISTENCE  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
CROPCIRCLES BY ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14
ADDITIONS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
MATH  1  2  3
EVOLUTION  1  2  3
OTHER REMARKS ON BIOLOGY  1  2  3