2

ELECTRIC NETFORCE IN REAL MATTER Back to the Contents

2

NETFORCE


   Localforce

  Non-relativistic and non-quantum mechanical research on electrically neutral multipoles shows in general that the netforce of a number of 2 to the power of m charges on a charge outside is inversely proportional to the distance to the cloud to the power of m+2 :

netforce of charges 1 /

So you see, the well-known inversely square Coulomb-law only appears for m=0, = 1, that is for one single charge only.

(In this storyline, from now on we speak about “a cloud” or “a cloud of charges” if we mean a cloud consisting of even amounts of positive and negative charges in a homogeneous distribution of space and charge).

So the netforce of a very small cloud (just a few numbers of pairs) on an outside charge may be significant on a small distance (like a few times the distance between the charges of one pair). The netforce per charge is significant then. But the netforce of a little larger cloud falls all too rapidly with the distance to be of any importance on a little larger scale. We can conclude:

The netforce of a charge distribution in a cloud as mentioned above only works local. Let’s call this a localforce.

Which means that for a charge in the cloud only the nearest parts are important for the netforce. The rest of the cloud can be neglected. The whole cloud can be considered to be a patchwork of border-overlapping localities, stitched together by the netforce. One patch only attracts adjacent patches and when the localities contract, the patchwork as a whole contracts too. Patches further away have no significant influence no more.

It acts as elastic matter, in which also tensors are used. Or as a jar of glueballs sticking together. Which both gives a reminder to the strong nuclear force, working over short distances only, as well as to page 3 of my storyline NEKG (Newton Einstein Kiekens Gravitation), The Higgs Field - Part 1.

What precisely is one locality? As mentioned above, this seems to be just one single charge. The electric field of one single charge has the least decrease with distance and hence the largest range, making the patches maximal.

When you begin with on pair of charges - one positive and one negative - and subsequently add more and more of such pairs, the total mass of the charge collection will increase proportional to the number of charges (except for the mass defect , a usually small special relativistic effect). But the increase in netforce remains far below proportionality to the number of charges. Instead there is another decrease which is proportional to the distance to the cloud to the power of the number of charges. At a fixed distance with a huge number of charges the netforce will be diminished by that distance to the power of that huge number of charges.

The formula of the netforce has a peculiar property with respect to that distance. If you position yourself on distance 1, you get 1 to the power or m+2, which is always 1. So at this special distance you may add as much charges as you like, but the diminishing-with-the-distance-effect will not work here. For distances even smaller than 1 one becomes a strong increase of the power with increasing number of charges. This distance 1 must be a special constant. I mean, it cannot be you can choose it arbitrarily. The force then would have no definite behaviour at a certain distance, by example in the case of adding charges, if you always might be able to choose that distance to be 1.

So we have now:

An electrically neutral cloud of charges contracts under the electric force of single charges which work only local. Two of such clouds, when in close contact, will merge.

In real matter the netforce seems to take the shape of the so called Van der Waals force. The Van der Waals force is inversely proportional to the 6th power of the distance. In the formula above this means that m+2 = 6 and so m = 4. One patch causing netforce has 2^m charges, 2^4 = 16 charges consisting of 2^3 = 8 positive ones and also 2^3 = 8 negative ones.

In QED the vacuum is filled with even amounts of electrons and positrons, as well as even amounts of mesons and antimesons, protons and antiprotons, and so on, however all in different relative densities. Particles swiftly popping in and out of existence too fast for detection, in doing so forming a cloud in which one expects a contracting netforce. The acquired velocities of the individual particles would vanish with them all the time, being replaced as they are by new particles that do not possess the additional velocities due to contraction.

But do the particles of the vacuum react with each other?


NEXT PAGE              Up              Back to the Contents              CONTACT
 





































One of those moons



THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: THE COLLAPSE OF THE WAVEFUNCTION  1  2  3  4  5
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: EXPERIMENTS ON THE COLLAPSE OF THE WAVEFUNCTION  1  2  3  4
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: FORWARD BACKWARD TIME DIRECTION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
THE SEA OF POSSIBILITIES: THE DIRECTION OF TIME  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14
NET FORCE IN REAL MATTER  1  2  3  4
NET FORCE IN QED  1  2  3  4  5
NET FORCE  1  2  3  4  5
QUANTUM QUATERNION DYNAMICS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10
NET FORCES IN QCD  0  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14  15  16
THOUGHT EXPERIMENTS ON MASSES  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
NEWTON EINSTEIN KIEKENS GRAVITATION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
QUATERNION GRAVITATION  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
EXPANSION OF THE UNIVERSE  1  2  3  4  5
SPECIAL RELATIVITY  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12
DIMENSIONS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
TIMETRAVEL  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8
EXISTENCE  1  2  3  4  5  6  7
CROPCIRCLES BY ELECTRIC AND MAGNETIC FIELDS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9  10  11  12  13  14
ADDITIONS  1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
MATH  1  2  3
EVOLUTION  1  2  3
OTHER REMARKS ON BIOLOGY  1  2  3